ID
261-K79-4G0

Shelterbelt - 2016

From Warming Huts at The Forks

Robert B Trempe Jr., Lincoln, NE USA ---- The beauty of barren trees and tall grass in the winter prairie is matched only by the sounds of their branches and brush moving in th wind from the plains. It's a constant and subtle rustle that becomes both audible landmark and sonic envelope. These Shelterbelts, planted by farmers, operate as protective areas for animal feeding as well as landmarks and delineations on the open landscape. This 'Shelterbelt' seeks to reimagine the qualities of these windbreaks through an environment of steel rebar. Several hundred steel stalks of varying lengths are anchored vertically to a base, creating a protective screen. Two entrances/exits allow indirect access, but the full interior (including seating) is only truly visible once inside the environment, creating a secret world for its occupants. Wind and the movement and interaction of those inside the installation causes the rebar to oscillate and collide, creating an almost constant metallic rustle; a sound field becomes an audible landmark and a sonic envelope for its inhabitants. While I may (typically) work alone, I approach all my work in a multi-disciplinary fashion. I am trained as an architect, work as an educator, and operate as an artist. I begin all of my projects by establishing a simple design logic capable of stringing together seemingly disparate information into a clear and concise concept. I am then able to operate in multiple disciplines because of this logic, which becomes instruction for the development of everything from aesthetic information to formal articulation and physical construction.

ArtMoi
DETAILS
Title

Shelterbelt - 2016


ArtMoi ID

261-K79-4G0


Artist

Warming Huts at The Forks


Caption

Robert B Trempe Jr., Lincoln, NE USA ---- The beauty of barren trees and tall grass in the winter prairie is matched only by the sounds of their branches and brush moving in th wind from the plains. It's a constant and subtle rustle that becomes both audible landmark and sonic envelope. These Shelterbelts, planted by farmers, operate as protective areas for animal feeding as well as landmarks and delineations on the open landscape. This 'Shelterbelt' seeks to reimagine the qualities of these windbreaks through an environment of steel rebar. Several hundred steel stalks of varying lengths are anchored vertically to a base, creating a protective screen. Two entrances/exits allow indirect access, but the full interior (including seating) is only truly visible once inside the environment, creating a secret world for its occupants. Wind and the movement and interaction of those inside the installation causes the rebar to oscillate and collide, creating an almost constant metallic rustle; a sound field becomes an audible landmark and a sonic envelope for its inhabitants. While I may (typically) work alone, I approach all my work in a multi-disciplinary fashion. I am trained as an architect, work as an educator, and operate as an artist. I begin all of my projects by establishing a simple design logic capable of stringing together seemingly disparate information into a clear and concise concept. I am then able to operate in multiple disciplines because of this logic, which becomes instruction for the development of everything from aesthetic information to formal articulation and physical construction.